Step 27 – Deceased Estate Administration Guide

Grant of Probate Application or Applying for Letters of Administration

  • Last Updated: December 2023

What is a Grant of Probate application? How different is it from applying for Letters of Administration? This step explains everything you need to know about these two different applications with the Supreme Court. Use our handy assessment to determine what type of application is required in your situation. The application process for the various states/territories is explained to help you with this key step.

Select State:

Probate Assessment

Find out if you need Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration in a few clicks.


Overview

As the Executor or Administrator, you will most likely be applying for a Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration. In Australia, Deceased Estate Probate is issued by the relevant Supreme Court and confirms the death, the validity of a Will (if one was in place) and formalises who will act as the Executor or Administrator to manage, administer and finalise the Deceased Estate for distribution. This means that bank accounts, property, tax and other obligations can be dealt with and claimed on behalf of the estate. The Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration will be requested by each organisation that releases funds and makes a transfer (e.g., title office, bank, insurance, superannuation, aged care home etc.).

This step will help you:
  • determine which type of application you need for your situation;
  • assess your personal liability and administration risk; and
  • apply to the relevant Supreme Court.

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27.1 Why Is a Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration Needed?

27.1.1 Overview
27.1.2 Why Organisations and Companies Require Probate
27.1.3 Why Executors and Administrators Should Apply for Probate
27.1.4 When Deceased Estate Probate Is Needed

27.1.1 Overview

By now, you would have determined the total Estate value by having compiled a detailed list of all the money, property, real estate, personal belongings, chattels, other valuables and any debts of the deceased person. The simplyEstate Assets & Liabilities Inventory helps you to put this together and automatically calculate what forms part of the Estate based on the ownership of each asset, liability and personal belonging.

In Steps 12 – 25 you have been in contact with the relevant government departments, companies and organisations that the deceased person had dealings with, to determine the individual value of accounts, benefits and claims that will be paid into the Estate. While you were in contact, the organisation may have already informed you that a Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration is required for them to transfer or release funds or titles to the Estate.

But what is Probate? What does Probate mean?

Probate is the judicial or legal process that a Testator's Will (the deceased person's Will) undergoes to prove that it is valid so it can function as a public document, and that it is considered the genuine final testament of the deceased. It formally recognises the Executor to complete the Estate Administration.

In the absence of a Will, Probate will establish that the laws of intestacy in the state or territory where the deceased resided at the time of death would apply. In such cases, the Supreme Court grants someone (typically the Next of Kin) Letters of Administration to begin the Estate Administration process.

Generally speaking, a Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration will be requested each time you request a transfer of property or release of funds into the 'Estate of the Late' bank account or Estate for finalising and distribution. An 'Estate of the Late' bank account should be opened while you wait for probate, which is covered in Steps 19.12 – Why Open an 'Estate of the Late' Bank Account and 30.3 – Set Up Estate Bank Account (Estate of the Late Account).

27.1.2 Why Organisations and Companies Require Probate

Some reasons why organisations and companies will ask for the Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration are to:
  • know that the deceased person has actually passed away and this was confirmed by the Supreme Court;
  • ensure that the organisation is dealing with the official representative (Executor or Administrator) of the Estate to avoid fraudulent claims;
  • be certain that the Supreme Court has reviewed the Will(s) (where available) for its validity and determine which was the latest Will to avoid a claim by someone who was superseded by a newer Will appointing someone else as Executor; and
  • have confidence that where no Will was in place, the Administrator has been properly identified and appointed by the Supreme Court to act on the Estate's behalf per the relevant laws to protect the asset they will transfer.

27.1.3 Why Executors and Administrators Should Apply for Probate

Some reasons why most Executors and Administrators make a Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration application are to:
  • follow due process by properly advertising the Notice of Intended Application and comply with the necessary timeframes required by law;
  • avoid duplication where another Will may exist appointing someone else as Executor who has applied or will also apply;
  • reduce your personal liability risk by needing to sign indemnity and release forms;
  • reduce your personal liability risk for claims made by another Executor, family member, Beneficiary or creditor against the Estate or yourself; and
  • reduce the likelihood of claims made against the Estate costing substantial funds and taking up time.

27.1.4 When Deceased Estate Probate Is Needed

Here are some examples that may help you understand when a Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration application is needed. When:
  • the Estate value is greater than $50,000;
  • the deceased person had bank accounts, property, shares, business interests, other assets or liabilities in their own name or as tenants in common;
  • you deal with the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) for previous individual tax returns or lodging an Estate tax return;
  • multiple Wills and codicils are in place or the Will may not be executed properly;
  • the Will requires a distribution to a vulnerable Beneficiary and/or a charitable organisation;
  • you foresee or have already experienced disputes and/or claims against the Estate by family members, beneficiaries or other parties and you as the Executor or Administrator want to protect yourself;
  • the deceased person divorced, married or re-married after making the Will;
  • the Will excludes immediate family members, step-children, ex-spouses and/or ex-defacto partners;
  • the deceased person had complex asset structures (including a trust, business, self-managed super fund (SMSF), shares and other investments);
  • the superannuation and/or life insurance benefit will be paid to the Estate;
  • assets are located in other states/territories or overseas; and/or
  • the deceased person lived in an aged care home and a RAD or bond will be claimed by the Estate.

Without a Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration, some organisations and companies may refuse to transfer funds, assets and/or liabilities to the Estate, effectively stopping you from finalising and distributing the Estate.

27.2 Three Types of Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration Applications

The following three types of court applications, also called grant of representation, exist:

27.2.1 Grant of Probate Application With the Will Annexed

Where a Will is in place and you are nominated as the only Executor or one of many Executors and you take on the role by yourself or with other Executors nominated, then you should apply for a Grant of Probate with the Supreme Court in the relevant state/territory.
Read the following Steps 27.3 – 27.11 to determine who is eligible to apply and how to apply.

Request a fixed-fee Grant of Probate application quote from our Trusted Partner. With the right legal advice, you can avoid submitting an incomplete application that will be rejected.

27.2.2 Letters of Administration With the Will Annexed

Where a Will is in place but none of the Executors nominated in the Will are willing or able to take on the role, the eligible person who will take on the role of Administrator should apply for Letters of Administration with the Will annexed with the Supreme Court in the relevant state/territory.
Read the following Steps 27.3 – 27.11 to determine who is eligible to apply and how to apply.

Request a fixed-fee Letters of Administration application quote from our Trusted Partner. With the right legal advice, you can avoid submitting an incomplete application that will be rejected.

27.2.3 Letters of Administration Without a Will

Where no Will is in place (also referred to as Intestate), the eligible person should apply for Letters of Administration with the Supreme Court in the relevant state/territory.
Read the following Steps 27.3 – 27.11 to determine who is eligible to apply and how to apply.

Request a fixed-fee Letters of Administration application quote from our Trusted Partner. With the right legal advice, you can avoid submitting an incomplete application that will be rejected.

27.3 Who Can Apply to the Supreme Court

The situation and type of application that needs to be made determine who will be applying to the Supreme Court for a Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration.

27.3.1 Grant of Probate Application With the Will Annexed
27.3.2 Letters of Administration With the Will Annexed
27.3.3 Letters of Administration without a Will

27.3.1 Grant of Probate Application With the Will Annexed

There are instances when it is clear the Testator (person who made the Will) had nominated only one Executor.

However, since situations vary, a Testator may also appoint more than one Executor of the Estate, even going so far as specifically designating who will serve as primary Executor and secondary Executor. Sometimes, an Executor or Executors may also refuse or be unable to perform their role for various reasons (including illness or death).

These varying circumstances will influence the application process, specifically who will be applying for a Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration.

With a Will That Nominates One Executor

If the Executor nominated in the Will accepts the role to administer the Deceased Estate, the Executor can apply to the Supreme Court for a Grant of Probate.

If the Executor nominated in the Will has passed away, is unable or unwilling to take on the role to administer the Deceased Estate, one of the Beneficiaries can apply as the Administrator (not called Executor in this case) to the Supreme Court for Letters of Administration with the Will annexed as outlined in Step 27.3.2 and provide further documentation as outlined in Step 27.11 below.

Request a fixed-fee Grant of Probate application quote from our Trusted Partner. Avoid an incomplete application being rejected.

With a Will That Nominates Multiple Executors

A Will may nominate multiple Executors by specifying a primary Executor (also known as instituted Executor) and a secondary Executor (also known as substituted Executor).

If the primary Executor accepts the role to administer the Deceased Estate, they can apply to the Supreme Court for Grant of Probate. If the secondary Executor accepts the role to administer the Deceased Estate, they can apply to the Supreme Court for a Grant of Probate if the conditions for substitution as outlined in the Will are met.

A Will may also nominate multiple Executors that are not distinct as primary or secondary Executors and hence must act jointly (joint Executors), meaning they all are to be Executors and administer the Deceased Estate together. In this situation all Executors can apply to the Supreme Court together. If, however, one of the Executors has passed away, is unable or unwilling to take on the role to administer the Estate, the remaining Executor(s) can apply for Grant of Probate and provide further documentation as outlined in Step 27.9 below.

Where a Will nominates multiple Executors and an Executor has passed away, is unable or unwilling to take on the duty, either an additional form, an Affidavit explaining the situation and, where an Executor has passed away, the Death Certificate of that Executor should be provided by the Executor who is applying to the Supreme Court.

Request a fixed-fee Grant of Probate application quote from our Trusted Partner. Avoid an incomplete application being rejected.

27.3.2 Letters of Administration With Will Annexed

With a Will That Does Not Name an Executor

If the Will does not name an Executor, depending on your state/territory, the listed persons can apply as the Administrator (not called Executor in this case) to the Supreme Court for Letters of Administration with the Will annexed.

New South Wales (NSW) – Sydney change State

The sole or main Beneficiary as per the Will should apply to the Supreme Court

Supreme Court of NSW

Applying for Letters of Administration with the Will annexed, Paragraph 5 (accessed 2/1/2021)

Victoria (VIC) – Melbourne change State The major Beneficiary as per the Will should apply to the Supreme Court in the following priority:
  • lawful spouse or domestic partner;
  • children, excluding step children, but including children adopted by the deceased;
  • grandchildren;
  • parents;
  • brothers or sisters; and
  • remoter next of kin.
Supreme Court of VIC

Applying for a grant of probate or administration, Step 2 (accessed 2/1/2021)

Queensland (QLD) – Brisbane change State
Relevant Legislation

UNIFORM CIVIL PROCEDURE RULES 1999 (QLD) Section 603 (Aust.) (accessed 2/1/2021)

To avoid a dispute with other eligible applicants and Beneficiaries, it is recommended that you agree upon your intention to apply prior to doing so as other eligible persons may also apply. A second application for the same Deceased Estate would mean your application is contested and may complicate matters unnecessarily.

Request a fixed-fee Letters of Administration application quote from our Trusted Partner. This way, you can avoid submitting an incomplete application that will be rejected.

With a Will and None of the Executors Will Apply

If the Executor nominated in the Will has passed away, is unable or unwilling to take on the role to administer the Deceased Estate, depending on your state/territory the below listed persons can apply as the Administrator (not called Executor in this case) to the Supreme Court for Letters of Administration with the Will annexed and provide further documentation as outlined in Step 27.11 below.

The following persons are eligible to apply as Administrator:

New South Wales (NSW) – Sydney change State

The sole or main Beneficiary as per the Will should apply to the Supreme Court

Supreme Court of NSW

Applying for Letters of Administration with the Will annexed, Paragraph 5 (accessed 2/1/2021)

Victoria (VIC) – Melbourne change State The major Beneficiary as per the Will should apply to the Supreme Court in the following priority:
  • lawful spouse or domestic partner;
  • children, excluding step children, but including children adopted by the deceased;
  • grandchildren;
  • parents;
  • brothers or sisters; and
  • remoter next of kin.
Supreme Court of VIC

Applying for a Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration, Step 2 (accessed 2/1/2021)

Queensland (QLD) – Brisbane change State
Relevant Legislation

UNIFORM CIVIL PROCEDURE RULES 1999 (QLD) Section 603 (Aust.) (accessed 2/1/2021)

Request a fixed-fee Letters of Administration application quote from our Trusted Partner. This way, you can avoid submitting an incomplete application that will be rejected.

27.3.3 Letters of Administration Without a Will

If there is no Will and the deceased person passed away Intestate, depending on your state/territory the below listed persons can apply as the Administrator (not called Executor in this case) to the Supreme Court for Letters of Administration.

To avoid a dispute with other eligible applicants and Beneficiaries, it is recommended to agree your intention to apply prior to doing so as other eligible persons may also apply. A second application for the same Deceased Estate would mean your application is contested and may complicate matters unnecessarily.

The following persons are eligible to apply as Administrator:

New South Wales (NSW) – Sydney change State
The following persons can apply for Letter of Administration as the Administrator of the Deceased Estate:
  • Spouse;
  • Next of Kin;
  • Spouse and Next of Kin;
  • a person that can be trusted as determined by the court; or
  • a person as directed by the court.
Relevant Legislation

PROBATE AND ADMINISTRATION ACT 1898 (NSW) Section 63 (Austl.) (accessed 2/1/2021)

Victoria (VIC) – Melbourne change State
The following persons can apply for Letter of Administration as the Administrator of the Deceased Estate:
  • lawful spouse or domestic partner;
  • children, excluding stepchildren, but including children adopted by the deceased;
  • grandchildren;
  • parents;
  • brothers or sisters; or
  • remoter next of kin.
Supreme Court of VIC

Applying for Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration, Step 2 (accessed 2/1/2021)

Queensland (QLD) – Brisbane change State
Relevant Legislation

UNIFORM CIVIL PROCEDURE RULES 1999 (QLD) Section 610 (Aust.) (accessed 2/1/2021)

Request a fixed-fee Letters of Administration application quote from our Trusted Partner. This way, you can avoid submitting an incomplete application that will be rejected.

27.4 Which Supreme Court to Apply to

An application needs to be made based on the state/territory in which the assets are registered and/or located. Each Supreme Court only has jurisdiction over their state/territory. If the deceased person holds assets registered and/or located in more than one state/territory that require a Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration, you may need to apply to multiple Supreme Courts or have the original Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration resealed in the relevant court(s).

The simplyEstate Assets & Liabilities Inventory helps you capture all assets and liabilities and automatically calculates the total Estate value that will need to be provided with the Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration application.

Request a fixed-fee Letters of Administration application quote from our Trusted Partner, so you can avoid submitting an incomplete application that will be rejected.

27.5 How Long Does Probate Take?

The process of being granted Probate can take anywhere between two to six weeks from the date of application. In general, however, the Deceased Estate Administration process usually takes around six to 12 months in Australia. The duration depends on the types of assets that need to be dealt with. If property that's part of the Estate needs to be sold, Probate can take a lot longer to finish.

DIY Probate applications can be delayed significantly because of errors or omissions, missing documents, incorrect declarations, or any incorrect applications of procedure.

Perth – Western Australia (WA) Sydney – New South Wales (NSW) Melbourne – Victoria (VIC) Brisbane – Queensland (QLD)
Waiting Period After Notice of Intent to Apply for Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration 14 days 14 days 15 days 14 days
Court Processing Time for Grant of Probate 4 weeks 20 working days 2 – 4 weeks 4 – 6 weeks
Court Processing Time When Applying for Letters of Administration 4 weeks 20 working days 2 – 4 weeks 4 – 6 weeks
Figures shown are valid as at 1 July 2023 and are subject to change.

New South Wales (NSW) – Sydney change State

How Long Does Probate Take in NSW?

Processing times may vary based on the number of applications before the Supreme Court of NSW. In general, however, applications lodged are sealed and returned within 20 working days of filing.

Victoria (VIC) – Melbourne change State

How Long Does Probate Take in Victoria?

It can take the Supreme Court of Victoria between two to four weeks to evaluate Probate applications, depending on workloads and the complexity of each application.

Queensland (QLD) – Brisbane change State

How Long Does a Grant of Probate Take in QLD?

In Queensland, a Grant of Probate can take anywhere between four to six weeks, depending on the workload of the Supreme Court.

27.6 How Much Does Probate Cost?

How much does probate cost, you might ask. The answer: It all depends on the state or territory you apply in and, in some states, how large the Estate is (i.e., including the assets and liabilities therein) as well as the gross value of Estate assets. The same can be said of Letters of Administration costs.

The logic behind this is that the size and value of the Estate determine how much work is required to obtain Probate and to administer assets. Probate costs include government-scaled costs for obtaining a Grant of Probate from the Supreme Court and negotiated legal costs for administering the Estate assets and liabilities.

Perth – Western Australia (WA) Sydney – New South Wales (NSW) Melbourne – Victoria (VIC) Brisbane – Queensland (QLD)
Search Fee $58.50 $71 $19.10 – $77.90 $28.20
Court Filing Fee $370 $0 – $6,652 $66.80 – $2,257.80 $793
Lawyers Fee Schedule $560 – $15,500
Notice of Intended Application $78.20 $53 $25.40 $161.70
Notice of Intended Filing of Accounts $53
Reseal Fee $0 – $6,652 $25.40 $793
Figures shown are valid as at 1 July 2023 and are subject to change.

New South Wales (NSW) – Sydney change State

How Much Does Probate Cost in NSW?

All legal and administrative costs arising from the application for a Grant of Probate are calculated based on the size of the Estate. The Probate costs in NSW will include the following filing fees from the Supreme Court NSW:

Gross Value of Estate Assets Held in NSW Grant of Probate Fee
less than $100,000 $0
$100,000 – $249,999 $863
$250,000 – $499,999 $1,171
$500,000 – $999,999 $1,797
$1,000,000 – $1,999,999 $2,394
$2,000,000 – $4,999,999 $3,991
greater than $5,000,000 $6,652

Probate Lawyer Supreme Court Scaled Fees NSW

Many Probate lawyers in Sydney refer to the following scale to determine their fees relating to preparing a Grant of Probate application.

Disclosed Value of Assets Base Fee (excl. GST) Incremental Fee (excl. GST)
less than $30,000 $560 $13.33 for each $1,000 up to $30,000
$30,000 – $149,999 $960 $5.90 for each $1,000 over $30,000
$150,000 – $999,999 $1,670 $4.47 for each $1,000 over $150,000
$1,000,000 – $2,999,999 $5,470 $1.66 for each $1,000 over $1,000,000
$3,000,000 – $4,999,999 $8,800 $1.10 for each $1,000 over $3,000,000
$5,000,000 – $9,999,999 $11,000 $0.90 for each $1,000 over $5,000,000
greater than $10,000,000 $15,500
Figures shown are valid as at 1 July 2023 and are subject to change.
Victoria (VIC) – Melbourne change State

How Much Does Probate Cost in Victoria?

Gross Value of Estate Assets Held in NSW Grant of Probate Fee
less than $500,000 $66.80
$500,000 – $999,999 $357.80
$1,000,000 – $1,999,999 $667.80
$2,000,000 – $2,999,999 $1,462.80
greater than $3,000,000 $2,257.80
Figures shown are valid as at 1 July 2023 and are subject to change.
Queensland (QLD) – Brisbane change State

How Much Does Probate Cost in QLD?

In Queensland (QLD), the cost of Probate application with the Supreme Court is $793, no matter the size of the Estate.

Figures shown are valid as at 1 July 2023 and are subject to change.

27.7 Important Information

It is important to remember the following as you work through this step:
  • The Statement of Assets & Liabilities should be completed before applying to the Supreme Court for a Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration as the figures form part of the application. This document outlines the value of the Estate, what it is made up of and protects you as the applicant in case a Beneficiary or other person lodges a dispute with the Supreme Court against the Estate. The simplyEstate Assets & Liabilities Inventory is a useful tool to compile all the Estate assets and liabilities in one place. Refer to Steps 15 – 26 to determine the Estate value if not already completed.
  • Should the Statement of Assets & Liabilities change after lodgement, an amended version can be submitted to the Supreme Court with an Affidavit to ensure an accurate statement is held on file.
  • An application for Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration can be lodged at the earliest 14 or 15 days after the date of advertising the notice of intended application (refer to Step 27.10 below).
  • A Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration application made six months after the death or later, requires an explanation for the delay in an Affidavit.
  • If the name of the Executor has changed and is different to the name in the Will, an explanation is to be provided in an Affidavit and the marriage certificate or other evidence of the name change attached.
  • If the deceased person married, divorced or a marriage was annulled after the date the Will was signed, you should check the validity of the Will with one of our trusted lawyers near you.
  • Refer to the person making the application as Plaintiff when completing the forms and documents for Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration.
  • The date on which the documents are completed should be the date of the document.

27.8 When Should a Lawyer Be Consulted?

Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration applications can vary in complexity.

The simplest applications are where a Will is in place naming:
  • one Executor who has agreed to accept the duties;
  • multiple Executors who are nominated who have agreed to accept the duties and act jointly; or
  • multiple Executor and the Executor who is unable or unwilling to accept the duties provides the applicant with the necessary documentation.

In these instances, the application can be completed by yourself following the process outlined on this website or with help from a legal representative.

However, simplyEstate always recommends having a lawyer review your situation and make the application to ensure all risks are identified, all appropriate documents, forms, affidavits and fees are submitted properly to avoid the court's rejection.

The biggest challenge when applying yourself (also called applying as individual, plaintiff or self-represented) is ensuring the application documents are drafted correctly and comprehensively.

Often, courts do not provide standard forms and hence, a good understanding of the laws and Probate rules are required to ensure your specific circumstances are captured correctly. simplyEstate provides documents that are available on the various Supreme Court websites below as a guide, but these may not capture all details for your circumstances and your application may need to be drafted by a lawyer.

Request a fixed-fee Probate application quote from our Trusted Partner, so you can avoid submitting an incomplete application that will be rejected.

27.9 Documents for Grant of Probate and Letters of Administration Application

27.9.1 Overview
27.9.2 The Function and Significance of Affidavits
27.9.3 Some Important Reminders

27.9.1 Overview

It is important to have all necessary documents completed and appropriately certified, witnessed and sworn to or affirmed prior to submitting your application.

The following documents are generally required when you apply:
  • Original Will (if the original cannot be found and you have a copy, you can apply but you will need an Affidavit explaining your attempts in finding the original Will and the process is more complicated);
  • Original and certified copy of the Death Certificate;
  • Relevant application documents;
  • Affidavit supporting your application; and
  • Lodgement fee.
Where a nominated Executor has passed away or is unable or unwilling to take on the duties, the following documents will also be required:
  • Form or Affidavit renouncing the duties of Executor; and
  • If a nominated Executor has passed away, the Death Certificate of the nominated Executor and an Affidavit by the applicant explaining the reason for applying without the deceased Beneficiary.

27.9.2 The Function and Significance of Affidavits

An affidavit is a written statement made under oath and serves as a legally binding document used to present facts or evidence in various legal matters.

Affidavits serve multiple functions:
  • Evidence: Affidavits are used to present evidence to the court or relevant authorities.
  • Verification: They confirm the truthfulness or veracity of statements made therein.
  • Documentation: Affidavits record information relevant to legal proceedings.
There are various scenarios where an affidavit may be required in Australia:
  • Probate and Estate Administration: Different types of affidavits are commonly used in the Estate Administration process in Australia, such as the Affidavit of Executor and Probate Affidavit.
  • Family Law Matters: In divorce or child custody cases, parties may submit affidavits to support their claims.
  • Criminal Proceedings: Witness statements can be presented as affidavits in criminal cases.
  • Civil Litigation: Parties may file affidavits to present their version of events.
  • Statutory Declarations: These affidavits are typically used for various administrative and legal purposes, such as visa applications.
Affidavits that may be used in Estate Administration typically involve the following:
  • Estate Inventory: Executors often prepare affidavits detailing the deceased person's assets and liabilities. This inventory assists in asset distribution.
  • Beneficiary Identification: To confirm the identities of Beneficiaries, their relationship to the deceased, and entitlements under the Will, this type of affidavit may be required.
  • Witnessing Wills: In some cases, witnesses to a Will may be required to provide affidavits confirming the Will's validity.
  • Challenging a Will: Beneficiaries or interested parties may submit affidavits to challenge a Will's validity or the circumstances surrounding its creation.
  • Asset Transfer: Affidavits may be required when transferring specific assets, such as real estate, from the Deceased Estate to the Beneficiaries.
  • Debts and Claims: Executors or Administrators may prepare affidavits to validate and address outstanding debts and claims against the Estate.
  • Estate Accounts: Affidavits can be used to provide an account of the Estate's financial transactions, ensuring transparency.

In Estate Administration, affidavits play a crucial role in documenting and verifying critical information. They help maintain transparency, substantiate claims, and ensure that the Estate is administered in accordance with the law.

Executors, Administrators, Beneficiaries, and legal professionals often rely on affidavits to facilitate the efficient and legally sound distribution of assets.

27.9.3 Some Important Reminders

Remember these important facts while preparing your documents:
  • Always type or neatly hand-write all documents and forms;
  • The original Will should not be modified in any way;
  • When photocopying a Will, do not remove staples or bindings;
  • Do not fold application documents;
  • Do not attach anything to the Will with staples or paperclips;
  • Always staple documents that belong together in the top left corner; and
  • It is highly recommended to always photocopy all documents supplied to the Supreme Court Registry for your own records.

27.10 Publish the Statutory Notice

If you have determined that a Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration is required, you may first need to serve, publish or advertise a notice of your intention to apply with the Supreme Court.

Note: This is not the same as notice for distribution of the Estate, which is covered in Step 34.7 – Publish Notice of Intent to Distribute.

Publishing a notice allows the following persons to get in touch with the Executor:
  • Creditors (people who are owed money by the Deceased Estate) of the Estate to make a claim;
  • Family members or other persons to make a family provision claim or any other claim;
  • Other nominated Executors to be informed of the intent and discuss the intended application; or
  • Anyone who may have another Will to discuss the intended application.

Depending on the state/territory in which you will be applying for a Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration, the following process and timeframe apply:

New South Wales (NSW) – Sydney change State

Supreme Court of New South Wales

Phone: 1300 679 272
Opening Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:30am – 4:30pm AEST
Email: sc.probate@justice.nsw.gov.au
Address: Law Courts Building, Level 5, 184 Phillip Street, Sydney NSW 2000
Post: Supreme Court of NSW, GPO Box 3, Sydney NSW 2001

Timeframe of Notice

The Notice of Intended Application must be published for at least 14 days before an application to the Supreme Court of NSW for Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration can be made.

Process – Online

The online portal for the Supreme Court of NSW allows you to complete and submit your Notice of Intended Application.

To use the online portal, you need to register first here.

To register you will need two of the following documents ready to identify yourself:
  • Australian Driver's licence
  • Australian electoral roll
  • Medicare card
  • Australian passport
  • Australian Citizenship Certificate
  • Change of Name Certificate
  • Phone Book
Process – Paper

If you cannot or do not want to apply for notice online, you can complete Form 116 – Notice of intended application for probate, administration or reseal and post it to the Supreme Court of NSW including the filing fee.

Case Number

Once your intention to apply for Grant of Probate was published you will be assigned a case number, which you will need to reference when making the application as outlined in Step 27.9 below.

Search for Previous Applications

Prior to lodging an application, you should check the online registry for previous applications that may have been made by another Executor, Administrator or Next of Kin. You can search here.

Fees
  • Notice of Intended Application: $53 (as at 1 July 2023)
  • Search fee: $71 (as at 1 July 2023)
Victoria (VIC) – Melbourne change State

Supreme Court of Victoria

Phone: 03 8600 2000
Opening Hours: Monday – Friday, 9:30am – 4:00pm AEST
Email: probate@supcourt.vic.gov.au
Address: 450 Little Bourke Street, Melbourne Victoria 3000
Post: Probate Office, Supreme Court of Victoria, 210 William Street, Melbourne Victoria 3000

Timeframe of Notice

The Notice of Intended Application must be published for at least 14 days before an application to the Supreme Court of VIC for Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration can be made.

Process – Online

The Probate Online Advertising System of the Supreme Court of VIC allows you to complete and submit your Request for Notice of Making a Grant. The application to the Supreme Court of VIC for Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration can only be made after 15 days after the date when the Notice of Intended Application was published.
To use the online system, click here and select which type of application you are advertising for.

For support with the Probate Online Advertising system you can call 03 9603 9296 or email: poas@supcourt.vic.gov.au.

Process – Paper

If you cannot submit the advertisement online, you can complete Form 3-6A – Request for Notice of Making of Grant and lodge it with the Supreme Court and pay cash or by cheque.

Search for Previous Applications

Prior to lodging an application, you should check the online registry for previous applications that may have been made by another Executor, Administrator or Next of Kin. You can search here.

Fees
  • Notice of an Intended Application: $25.40 (as at 1 July 2023)
  • Search fee: $19.10 – $77.90 (as at 1 July 2023)
Queensland (QLD) – Brisbane change State

Supreme Court of Queensland

Phone: 1800 479 117
Opening Hours: Monday – Friday, 9:00am – 4:00pm AEST
Email: enquiries@queenslandreports.com.au
Address: QEII Courts of Law Complex, 415 George Street, Brisbane Qld 4000
Post: PO Box 15167, City East Qld 4002

Timeframe of Notice

The application to the Supreme Court of QLD for Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration can only be made after 14 days after the date when the Notice of Intended Application was published.

Process
  1. You will need to prepare a Form 103 – Notice of intention to apply for grant.
  2. Submit your completed advertisement to the Public Trustee office near you.
  3. Wait for 14 days after the notice was advertised in the Queensland Law Reporter to allow other persons to file a caveat or objection with the court.
Search for Previous Applications

Prior to lodging an application, you should check the Probate Notice Database for previous applications that may have been made by another Executor, Administrator or Next of Kin. You can search here.

Fees

Notice of an Intended Application: $161.70 (as at 1 July 2023)

27.11 Grant of Probate Application Process

The Probate application process and documents vary in each state/territory. simplyEstate has compiled all the common information and documents for your selected state/territory for your convenience below.

Note: in some applications the Executor making a Grant of Probate application is referred to as plaintiff.

Depending on the state/territory to which you will apply for a Grant of Probate, the following process applies:

New South Wales (NSW) – Sydney change State

Supreme Court of New South Wales

Phone: 1300 679 272
Opening Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:30am – 4:30pm AEST
Email: sc.probate@justice.nsw.gov.au
Address: Law Courts Building, Level 5, 184 Phillip Street, Sydney NSW 2000
Post: Supreme Court of NSW, GPO Box 3, Sydney NSW 2001

Grant of Probate Application in NSW

Documents and Information Needed
  • Applicant's full name and address;
  • Deceased's full name (at the time of passing and at birth) and last address;
  • Deceased's marital status at the time of signing the Will (if applicable);
  • Witnesses' of the Will (and Codicils if applicable) full name and address; and
  • Asset and liability details incl. property details as per the property title, share register, bank accounts, vehicle registrations (if applicable).
Process – Paper

The following documents and templates can be used for a paper-based application. For complicated applications and when in doubt, it is recommended to seek legal advice. simplyEstate partners with legal firms that can help with this task and can be found below.

Affidavits
You must swear or affirm your Affidavit in front of a:
  • Justice of the Peace;
  • practicing lawyer with a current certificate; or
  • public notary.
You and one of the above listed witnesses must sign:
  • each page of the Affidavit;
  • the final page of the Affidavit; and
  • the cover of the Will.
Relevant Documents
You will need to provide the following documents or as requested by the Supreme Court: Other documents that may be useful:
  • Form 123 – Renouncing executorship – if an Executor is unable or unwilling to take on the duties of the Executor this form can be used to officially lodge the renouncing with the Supreme Court
Fees
  • Application for Grant of Probate: $0 – $6,652 (as at 1 July 2023) depending on the total value of the Estate, which can be checked here
  • Search fee: $71 (as at 1 July 2023)
  • Reseal fee: $0 – $6,652 (as at 1 July 2023) depending on the total value of the Estate, which can be checked here
Website

Supreme Court of NSW, Applying for probate

Estimated Processing Time

20 work days. Please refer to this website for current processing times.

Relevant Legislation
PROBATE AND ADMINISTRATION ACT 1898 (NSW) (Austl.) (accessed 2/1/2021)
PROBATE AND ADMINISTRATION ACT 1898 (NSW) Section 81A (Austl.) (accessed 5/4/2021)
SUCCESSION ACT 2006 2006 (NSW) (Austl.) (accessed 2/1/2021)
SUPREME COURT RULES PART 78 (NSW) (Austl.) (accessed 2/1/2021)
Victoria (VIC) – Melbourne change State

Supreme Court of Victoria

Phone: 03 8600 2000
Opening Hours: Monday – Friday, 9:30am – 4:00pm AEST
Email: probate@supcourt.vic.gov.au
Address: 450 Little Bourke Street, Melbourne Victoria 3000
Post: Probate Office, Supreme Court of Victoria, 210 William Street, Melbourne Victoria 3000

Application for Grant of Probate in Victoria

Documents and Information Needed
  • Applicant's full name and address;
  • Deceased's full name (at the time of passing and at birth) and last address;
  • Deceased's marital status at the time of signing the Will (if applicable);
  • Witnesses' of the Will (and Codicils if applicable) full name and address; and
  • Asset and liability details incl. property details as per the property title, share register, bank accounts, vehicle registrations (if applicable).
Process – Online

The online application process of the Supreme Court of Victoria, called RedCrest-Probate, allows completion and submission of simple Grant of Probate applications step by step, and can be accessed here.

An affidvait is generated as part of the online application process.

Where multiple Executors were nominated in the Will, all Executors must be recorded on the online lodgement portal and indication provided whether or not each will be taking on the duties (solely or jointly where more than one Executor), an individual reserve leave to apply at a later stage if they wish or completely resign from their duties, also called renounce. See Step 5.8 to learn more about how to renounce executorship.

Process – Paper

The relevant documents should be completed and filed with the Probate Office of the Supreme Court in person.
For complicated applications and when in doubt, it is recommended to seek legal advice. simplyEstate partners with legal firms that can help with this task and can be found below.

Affidavits
You must swear or affirm your Affidavit(s) in front of a:
  • Justice of the Peace;
  • practicing lawyer with a current certificate; or
  • authorised witness at the Supreme Court Probate Office when lodging the application.
You and one of the above listed witnesses must sign:
  • each page of the Affidavit;
  • the final page of the Affidavit; and
  • the cover of the Will.
Relevant Documents
You will need to provide the following documents or as requested by the Supreme Court:
  • A copy of the advertisement as per Step 27.10;
  • original Will and Codicils (if applicable);
  • original and certified copy of the Death Certificate
  • any other Affidavits or documents in support of your application; and,
the appropriate forms as determined based on your situation: Fees
  • Application for Grant of Probate: $66.80 – $2,257.80 (as at 1 July 2023) depending on the total value of the Estate, which can be checked here
  • Search fee: $19.10 – $77.90 (as at 1 July 2023)
  • Reseal fee: $25.40 (as at 1 July 2023)
Website

Supreme Court of VIC Applying for Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration

Estimated Processing Time

2 – 4 weeks

Note: If the Deceased Estate involves real estate, it is a requirement to notify the Victorian State Revenue Office about commencement of administration within a month after Grant of Probate was issued. Access the SRO VIC commencement of administration form and details.

Queensland (QLD) – Brisbane change State

Supreme Court of Queensland

Phone: 1800 479 117
Opening Hours: Monday – Friday, 9:00am – 4:00pm AEST
Email: enquiries@queenslandreports.com.au
Address: QEII Courts of Law Complex, 415 George Street, Brisbane Qld 4000
Post: PO Box 15167, City East Qld 4002

Grant of Probate Application in QLD

Documents and Information Needed
  • Applicant's full name and address;
  • Deceased's full name (at the time of passing and at birth) and last address;
  • Deceased's marital status at the time of signing the Will (if applicable);
  • Witnesses' of the Will (and Codicils if applicable) full name and address; and
  • Asset and liability details incl. property details as per the property title, share register, bank accounts, vehicle registrations (if applicable).
Process – Paper

The following documents and templates can be used for a paper-based application. For complicated applications and when in doubt, it is recommended to seek legal advice. simplyEstate partners with legal firms that can help with this task and can be found below.

Affidavits
You must swear or affirm your Affidavit in front of a:
  • Justice of the Peace;
  • practicing lawyer with a current certificate; or
  • public notary.
You and one of the above listed witnesses must sign:
  • each page of the Affidavit;
  • the final page of the Affidavit; and
  • the cover of the Will.
Relevant Documents

You will need to provide the following documents or as requested by the Supreme Court depending on the type of application appropriate for your circumstances:

Grant of Probate: Fees

Application for Grant of Probate and Reseal: $793 (as at 1 July 2023)

Website

Supreme Court of QLD Applying for a grant

Estimated Processing Time

4 – 6 weeks

27.12 Applying for Letters of Administration

Similar to applying for a Grant of Probate, the process, documentary requirements and fees that need to be paid when applying for Letters of Administration depend on the state/territory. simplyEstate has compiled all the common information and documents for your selected state/territory for your convenience below.

Note: In some applications for Letters of Administration, the person or Next of Kin filing the document is referred to as the plaintiff.

Depending on the state/territory to which you will be applying for Letters of Administration, the following process applies:

New South Wales (NSW) – Sydney change State

Supreme Court of New South Wales

Phone: 1300 679 272
Opening Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:30am – 4:30pm AEST
Email: sc.probate@justice.nsw.gov.au
Address: Law Courts Building, Level 5, 184 Phillip Street, Sydney NSW 2000
Post: Supreme Court of NSW, GPO Box 3, Sydney NSW 2001

Applying for Letters of Administration in NSW

Letters of Administration applications are considered a complex legal process and simplyEstate recommends seeking professional advice to consider your situation and to be able to draft the appropriate forms and documents needed by the Supreme Court.

Request a fixed-fee Letters of Administration application quote from our trusted partner, so you can avoid submitting an incomplete application that will be rejected.

Documents and Information Needed
  • Applicant's full name and address;
  • Deceased's full name (at the time of passing and at birth) and last address;
  • Deceased's marital status at the time of signing the Will (if applicable);
  • Witnesses' of the Will (and Codicil) full name and address (if applicable); and
  • Asset and liability details incl. property details as per the property title, share register, bank accounts, vehicle registrations (if applicable).
Process – Paper

The following documents and templates can be used as a guide for a paper-based application. For complicated applications and when in doubt, it is recommended to seek legal advice. simplyEstate partners with legal firms that can help with this task and can be found below.

Affidavits
You must swear or affirm your Affidavit in front of a:
  • Justice of the Peace;
  • practicing lawyer with a current certificate; or
  • public notary.
You and one of the above listed witnesses must sign:
  • each page of the Affidavit;
  • the final page of the Affidavit; and
  • the cover of the Will (if applicable).
Relevant Documents
You will need to provide the following documents or as requested by the Supreme Court: Other documents that may be useful:
  • Form 123 – Renouncing executorship – if an Executor is unable or unwilling to take on the duties of the Executor this form can be used to officially lodge the renouncing with the Supreme Court
Fees
  • Application for Letters of Administration: $0 – $6,652 (as at 1 July 2023) depending on the total value of the Estate, which can be checked here
  • Search fee: $71 (as at 1 July 2023)
  • Reseal fee: $0 – $6,652 (as at 1 July 2023) depending on the total value of the Estate, which can be checked here
Website

Supreme Court of NSW, Applying for a grant of letters of administration

Estimated Processing Time

20 working days. Please refer to this website for current processing times.

Relevant Legislation
PROBATE AND ADMINISTRATION ACT 1898 (NSW) (Austl.) (accessed 2/1/2021)
PROBATE AND ADMINISTRATION ACT 1898 (NSW) Section 81A (Austl.) (accessed 5/4/2021)
SUCCESSION ACT 2006 2006 (NSW) (Austl.) (accessed 2/1/2021)
SUPREME COURT RULES PART 78 (NSW) (Austl.) (accessed 2/1/2021)
Victoria (VIC) – Melbourne change State

Supreme Court of Victoria

Phone: 03 8600 2000
Opening Hours: Monday – Friday, 9:30am – 4:00pm AEST
Email: probate@supcourt.vic.gov.au
Address: 450 Little Bourke Street, Melbourne Victoria 3000
Post: Probate Office, Supreme Court of Victoria, 210 William Street, Melbourne Victoria 3000

Applying for Letters of Administration in Victoria

Letters of Administration applications are considered a more complex legal process and simplyEstate recommends seeking professional advice to consider your situation and to be able to draft the appropriate forms and documents needed by the Supreme Court.

Request a fixed-fee Letters of Administration application quote from our trusted partnerso you can avoid submitting an incomplete application that will be rejected.

Documents and Information Needed
  • Applicant's full name and address;
  • Deceased's full name (at the time of passing and at birth) and last address;
  • Deceased's marital status at the time of signing the Will (if applicable);
  • Witnesses' of the Will (and Codicil) full name and address (if applicable); and
  • Asset and liability details incl. property details as per the property title, share register, bank accounts, vehicle registrations (if applicable).
Process – Online

The online application process of the Supreme Court of Victoria, called RedCrest-Probate, allows applying for Letters of Administration applications step by step, and can be accessed here.

An affidvait is generated as part of the online application process.

If all Executors in the Will (if applicable) wish to resign from their duties, see step 5.8 to learn more about how to renounce executorship.

Process – Paper

The relevant documents should be completed and filed with the Probate Office of the Supreme Court in person.
For complicated applications and when in doubt, it is recommended to seek legal advice. simplyEstate partners with legal firms that can help with this task and can be found below.

Affidavits
You must swear or affirm your Affidavit(s) in front of a:
  • Justice of the Peace;
  • practicing lawyer with a current certificate; or
  • authorised witness at the Supreme Court Probate Office when lodging the application.
You and one of the above listed witnesses must sign:
  • each page of the Affidavit;
  • the final page of the Affidavit; and
  • the cover of the Will (if applicable).
Relevant Documents
You will need to provide the following documents or as requested by the Supreme Court:
  • A copy of the advertisement as per Step 27.10;
  • original Will and Codicils (if applicable);
  • original and certified copy of the Death Certificate
  • any other Affidavits or documents in support of your application; and,
the appropriate forms as determined based on your situation:
  • Form Kit – Letters of Administration with the Will Annexed; or
  • Form Kit – Letters of Administration/Intestacy.
Fees
  • Applying for Letters of Administration: $66.80 – $2,257.80 (as at 1 July 2023) depending on the total value of the Estate, which can be checked here
  • Search fee: $19.10 – $77.90 (as at 1 July 2023)
  • Reseal fee: $25.40 (as at 1 July 2023)
Website

Supreme Court of VIC Applying for Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration

Estimated Processing Time

2 – 4 weeks

Note: If the Deceased Estate involves real estate, it is a requirement to notify the Victorian State Revenue Office about commencement of administration within a month after Letters of Administration was issued. Access the SRO VIC commencement of administration form and details.

Queensland (QLD) – Brisbane change State

Supreme Court of Queensland

Phone: 1800 479 117
Opening Hours: Monday – Friday, 9:00am – 4:00pm AEST
Email: enquiries@queenslandreports.com.au
Address: QEII Courts of Law Complex, 415 George Street, Brisbane Qld 4000
Post: PO Box 15167, City East Qld 4002

Applying for Letters of Administration in QLD

Letters of Administration applications are considered a complex legal process and simplyEstate recommends seeking professional advice to consider your situation and to be able to draft the appropriate forms and documents needed by the Supreme Court.

Request a fixed-fee Letters of Administration application quote from our trusted partner, so you can avoid submitting an incomplete application that will be rejected.

Documents and Information Needed
  • Applicant's full name and address;
  • Deceased's full name (at the time of passing and at birth) and last address;
  • Deceased's marital status at the time of signing the Will (if applicable);
  • Witnesses' of the Will (and Codicil) full name and address (if applicable); and
  • Asset and liability details incl. property details as per the property title, share register, bank accounts, vehicle registrations (if applicable).
Process – Paper

The following documents and templates can be used for a paper-based application. For complicated applications and when in doubt, it is recommended to seek legal advice. simplyEstate partners with legal firms that can help with this task and can be found below.

Affidavits
You must swear or affirm your Affidavit in front of a:
  • Justice of the Peace;
  • practicing lawyer with a current certificate; or
  • public notary.
You and one of the above listed witnesses must sign:
  • each page of the Affidavit;
  • the final page of the Affidavit; and
  • the cover of the Will.
Relevant Documents

You will need to provide the following documents or as requested by the Supreme Court depending on the type of application appropriate for your circumstances:

Letter of Administration with the Will Annexed: Letter of Administration without a Will: Fees

Applying for Letters of Administration and Reseal: $793 (as at 1 July 2023)

Website

Supreme Court of QLD Applying for a grant

Estimated Processing Time

4 – 6 weeks

27.13 What Happens After Probate is Granted

After submitting your application with the relevant Supreme Court, you may wonder what happens after Probate is granted.

The Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration will formally empower you to act on behalf of the Deceased Estate and you can transfer property (all assets and liabilities in the deceased person's name) to the Estate and then from the Estate/Executor to the Beneficiary or Beneficiaries.

What Happens After Probate?

The following activities should be completed after Probate is granted:

Read Further

You are currently on Step 27 – Grant of Probate Application or Applying for Letters of Administration. Other steps of interest may be:

< Step 5 – The Role of Executor of a Will or Administrator of Estate < Step 15 – Determining Deceased Estate Assets & the Residuary Estate > Step 30 – Estate Bank Account Setup & Transfer of Deceased Estate Property

Complete Step

Actions and Decisions to Complete Step Yourself

If you have decided to complete this Step yourself, some actions and decisions may be to:

  1. Understand why a Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration application is needed based on the Estate, risk of possible disputes or claims, or requirements by organisations to release assets (see Step 27.1 above);
  2. Determine which type of application you will need to lodge with the Supreme Court, e.g., Grant of Probate where a valid Will is in place and at least one of the nominated Executors will apply, or Letters of Administration with or without a Will (see Step 27.2 above);
  3. Establish who can and will apply for Probate (see Step 27.3 above);
  4. Find out to which Supreme Court(s) you will apply to based on the location and registration of the assets (see Step 27.4 above);
  5. Learn how long Probate takes and how much Probate costs to plan ahead (see Step 27.5 and Step 27.6 above)
  6. Prepare the relevant documents for submission (see Step 27.9 above and forms below);
  7. Publish the statutory notice in the relevant state/territory that you will be applying in (see Step 27.10 above);
  8. Apply to the relevant Supreme Court (see Step 27.11 and Step 27.12 above); and
  9. Read about what happens after probate is granted (see Step 27.13 above).

Click for supporting:

Information

Forms

Legislation

New South Wales (NSW) – Sydney change State
Victoria (VIC) – Melbourne change State
Queensland (QLD) – Brisbane change State

Cost & Effort

Reading: 1.5 hrs
Preparing: 2-5 hrs
Completing: 1-3 hrs
Waiting: 3-10 wks
Total: 3-11 wks
Cost: $370–$5,948

Effort and cost are general estimates only and are based on the assumption that you complete this step without experienced support.

Instructions

To find out how this Process Guide works, access the instructions here.

Glossary

To find out what the capitalised words mean, access the glossary here.

New South Wales (NSW) – Sydney change State
Victoria (VIC) – Melbourne change State
Queensland (QLD) – Brisbane change State

Forms

Refer to Step 27.8 and Step 27.9 above for more detail about these forms.
Other forms not listed here may be required based on your specific circumstances.

Checklists & Tools

Download Australia's smartest Assets & Liabilities Inventory to automatically calculate the Estate value for Grant of Probate.
New South Wales (NSW) – Sydney change State
Victoria (VIC) – Melbourne change State
Queensland (QLD) – Brisbane change State

Legislation & Rules

Grant of Probate in NSW

Assets & Liabilities

PROBATE AND ADMINISTRATION ACT 1898 (NSW) Section 81A (Austl.) (accessed 5/4/2021)

Letters of Administration in NSW

With a Will

Supreme Court of NSW, Applying for Letters of Administration with the Will annexed Paragraph 5 (accessed 2/1/2021)
PROBATE AND ADMINISTRATION ACT 1898 (NSW) Section 81A (Austl.) (accessed 5/4/2021)

Without a Will

PROBATE AND ADMINISTRATION ACT 1898 (NSW) Section 63 (Austl.) (accessed 2/1/2021)
PROBATE AND ADMINISTRATION ACT 1898 (NSW) Section 81A (Austl.) (accessed 5/4/2021)

Grant of Probate in NSW

Assets & Liabilities

ADMINISTRATION AND PROBATE ACT 1958 (VIC) Section 28 (Austl.) (accessed 5/4/2021)

Letters of Administration VIC

Letters of Administration in QLD

With a Will

UNIFORM CIVIL PROCEDURE RULES 1999 (QLD) Section 603 (Aust.) (accessed 2/1/2021)

Without a Will

UNIFORM CIVIL PROCEDURE RULES 1999 (QLD) Section 610 (Aust.) (accessed 2/1/2021)

Other legislation and rules not listed here may apply to your specific circumstances.


Guidance & Support

Executor Checklists & Tools

check boxes symbolising executor checklists and tools
Don't forget important tasks with Australia's most used Executor Handbook, Checklists and Tools. We recommend the Assets & Liabilities Inventory to automatically calculate the total Estate value based on ownership for probate.
Download Here

Trusted Support

Have you encountered a challenge needing professional support, or are you unsure about how to proceed? Find out about our support options and personal guidance to get you back on your way with confidence.

New South Wales (NSW) – Sydney change State
Victoria (VIC) – Melbourne change State
Queensland (QLD) – Brisbane change State
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Executor & Administrator Support NSW

We can help with:
  • discussing this step in detail
  • assessing your approach and best way forward
  • engaging an Estate & Probate Lawyer

Review our services and book a free phone appointment.

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Trusted Partner apply for grant of probate or letters of administration with support from Marsdens Law Group in Sydney Camden Campbelltown Leppington Liverpool New South Wales NSW

Estate & Probate Lawyer NSW

Our trusted partner can help with:
  • preparing and submitting a Grant of Probate application
  • applying for Letters of Administration
  • administering the Estate end-to-end
Request an obligation free phone call to discuss your situation. Find Out More
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Executor & Administrator Support VIC

We can help with:
  • discussing this step in detail
  • assessing your approach and best way forward
  • engaging an Estate & Probate Lawyer

Review our services and book a free phone appointment.

Find Out More
Trusted Partner apply for grant of probate or letters of administration with support from McNab McNab & Starke Lawyers in Melbourne Essendon Sunbury VIC

Estate & Probate Lawyer VIC

Our trusted partner can help with:
  • preparing and submitting a Grant of Probate application
  • applying for Letters of Administration
  • administering the Estate end-to-end

Request an obligation free phone call to discuss your situation.

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Executor & Administrator Support QLD

We can help with:
  • discussing this step in detail
  • assessing your approach and best way forward
  • engaging an Estate & Probate Lawyer

Review our services and book a free phone appointment.

Find Out More
Trusted Partner apply for grant of probate or letters of administration with support from The Estate Lawyers in Brisbane Gold Coast QLD

Estate & Probate Lawyer QLD

Our trusted partner can help with:
  • preparing and submitting a Grant of Probate application
  • applying for Letters of Administration
  • administering the Estate end-to-end

Request an obligation free phone call to discuss your situation.

Find Out More