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Step 10 - Source Other Relevant Documents

Last updated: June 2019

Why is this important?

This step explains everything you need to know to help determine what types of dealings the deceased person had with which organisations and to notify them of the death as outlined later in Step 12. This investigative work is critical to understand what the deceased estate is made up of and to stop payments for services that are no longer needed.

 

simplyEstate is here to help with the process. Contact us via email or book a first free phone appointment.

Approximate Effort & Cost​

Reading: 10 mins
Completing: 1-4 hrs
Total: 1:10-4:10 hrs
Cost: $0

Effort and cost are general estimates only and are based on the assumption that you complete this step without specialist help.

Instructions

To find out how this Process Guide works, access the instructions here.

Glossary

To find out what the capitalised words mean, access the glossary here.

10.1 Overview

At this stage, it is important to get a good overview of the deceased person’s affairs. Reviewing files, documents, post and emails can help you understand:

  • the dealings the deceased has had with various government departments, companies and organisations;
  • what documents are available that you may need to administer the deceased estate;
  • if there are any bills due or overdue;
  • if any loan or mortgage repayments need to be maintained;
  • if regular payments need to be made;
  • insurance policies that you may need to pay or are be able to claim from;
  • if any subscriptions and memberships are in place; and
  • what customer, identification and membership numbers exist to help identify the deceased person when notifying authorities, companies and organisations (see Step 12 – Notify the Relevant Government Departments, Companies and Organisations).

You can download and print the simplyEstate Document Checklist to get an idea what types of common documents you should consider looking for.

 

Please note that most companies have a formal process in place for the Executor or Administrator of the deceased estate to gain access to the relevant information, make claims, pay bills and close accounts.

 

This Step is focused on getting a good overview of the government departments, companies and organisations the deceased had dealings with. The formal processes for each dealing is explained in the later Steps.

If you were able to locate the Will as outlined in Step 4 – Locate the Will & Insurance Information, other important documents may also be stored in a similar spot.

 

Contents
10.2 Types of Documents to Look For
10.3 Location of Documents
10.4 Actions and Decisions to Complete Step

10.2 Types of Documents to Look For

This step is a critical part of determining the deceased person’s dealings and affairs. You want to find out which government departments, companies and organisations the deceased person paid regular payments to and held memberships or subscriptions with.

 

As the Executor or Administrator, you should develop a good understanding of all possible key documents. This will allow you or simplyEstate to then contact each relevant organisation and notify them of the death to stop regular direct debits, yearly subscription renewals or any other obligations and save money.

 

Among others, some of the key documents to look for may include:

  • Bank statements – to understand which bank(s) and how many bank accounts are in place
  • Service provider tax invoices – to understand all services subscribed to including mobile phone, landline, internet, newspapers, magazines, Foxtel, Netflix, Stan or other paid TV, music streaming services such as Spotify, wine clubs, gym or sport memberships and any other subscriptions.
  • Government payment slips – to understand if any government pension or other payments were received
  • Payslip – to understand who the employer was
  • Insurance tax invoices – to understand what insurances are in place and when they end including health, home, contents, car, other vehicles and pet
  • Utilities bills (water, gas and electricity) – to understand who to notify if those services can be stopped or reduced or if there are investment properties
  • Council tax invoices – to understand how much needs to be paid if the property is owned
  • Bills from the Transport Department – to understand if there are any outstanding fines, driver’s license renewals or registration payments that are no longer needed
  • Superannuation statements – to understand which superannuation fund(s) and how much funds are in place
  • Real estate agent tax invoices – to understand if rent is due or if an investment property is rented out
  • Strata levy invoices – to understand if levies are due for the rental property or if an investment property exists
  • Share certificates – to understand what types of shares and the value
  • Professional membership tax invoices – to understand what memberships are in place such as Chartered Accountants, CPA, Engineers Australia, Law Society and others to stop automatic renewals
  • Professional services tax invoices – to understand if an accountant, lawyer, tax professional or financial planner was used who may have important information
  • Investment fund statements – to understand if there are funds held by companies other than banks

You can download and save on your computer or print the simplyEstate Document Checklist to provide an idea of the types of documents you should be looking for. This will help you to develop a full picture of the deceased person’s dealings. By working through this diligently and capturing all the necessary details, this work will go a long way to help you with the administration process.

simplyEstate is here to help.

Contact us via email or book your free first phone appointment.

10.3 Possible Location of Documents

If you or a family member (with or without Power of Attorney) supported the deceased person with their general banking, making payments, manage tax and kept records before they passed away, you should be able to get a good idea where important documents are stored.

 

If you are unsure, simplyEstate has listed some ideas where to start as follows:

The first port of call is to speak to the deceased person’s family. The family may know exactly where documents are located and have a good idea which dealings the deceased had. In some cases, relatives may have already looked after financial and other affairs leading up to the death and kept records that will be important to you.

If the deceased person had appointed a Power of Attorney, that person may have been dealing with financial and other affairs and should have kept records that you can access or take over.

The deceased person’s wallet containing their driver’s licence, Medicare card, bank and insurance cards will help you understand crucial information.

If the deceased still lived at home it may well be that most documents were stored in a filing cabinet, cupboard or office. You may already know or quickly develop an understanding as to how the person organised their affairs and whom they may have told about them.

Another good way to get an understanding of the deceased person’s dealings with various government departments, companies and organisations is to look through the post. This may require some monitoring over a number of weeks or even months until a full picture can be made of all the dealings. See Step 21 – Check & Redirect Post.

Today, computers play a key role in communicating and organising information, documents and correspondence.

If the deceased person has provided their digital asset access to you in the form of a password manager tool or a list of accounts and passwords, then you may want to login to their Computer and look for important documents to help you with the deceased estate administration process. Looking for some of the following may help you develop a good overview:

  • Recent files in the most common applications such as Word and Excel;
  • Recent files in the File Explorer, changing the view to ‘Detail’ and sorting by date to check recent activity;
  • Run a specific keyword search in the File Explorer or Start menu to find documents relevant to you;
  • Folders that may have information relevant to you; and
  • Recent browser history to determine frequently visited pages to determine who the person banked with, any online subscriptions or other valuable information.

Today, email plays a key role for government departments, companies and organisations to communicate with its customers.

 

If the deceased person has provided their digital asset access to you in form of a password manager tool or a list of accounts and passwords, then you may want to login to their email accounts and search for specific keywords to determine their dealings including:

  • bill
  • invoice
  • payment
  • due
  • utilities
  • electricity
  • water
  • bank
  • statement
  • insurance
  • renewal
  • subscription
  • $

If you haven’t been provided with the login details, you may be able to gain access in certain circumstances by contacting the email services provider directly:

  • Gmail – Google Account Help can be accessed here
  • Hotmail – Microsoft Community Forum can be accessed here
  • Live – Microsoft Community Forum can be accessed here
  • Outlook – Microsoft Community Forum can be accessed here
  • PigPond – Telstra Crowd Support Forum can be accessed here
  • Yahoo Mail – Yahoo Help can be accessed here

If you have the deceased person’s mobile phone in your possession and were given access you may be able to access various forms of communication by companies and organisations the person dealt with. You may even have access to emails via the phone.

 

If you can’t access the phone, you can find out if their phone was synchronised to their Google account for Android phones or iTunes for Apple iPhones to recover the data stored.

 

If you are unable to access the phone and think access to the mobile phone is crucial to finding relevant information and documentation to facilitate the deceased estate administration, you may be able to request a court order to grant access. It is recommended you seek legal advice.

Some online accounts provide additional security by activating Two Factor Authentication (2FA). If you come across an online account to which you were granted access and that requires 2FA, you will need access to the codes. In most instances a mobile phone application is used to access a 2FA application that shows temporary codes that expire every 30 seconds.

 

The most common applications to look for are:

  • Google Authenticator
  • Microsoft Authenticator
  • LastPass Authenticator
  • Authy
  • FreeOTP Authenticator
  • Sophos Authenticator
  • Authenticator Plus
  • SoundLogin
  • Protectimus Smart OTP
  • Yubikey

Banks offer deposit boxes for important documents and other valuables to be stored safely. You will need to find out with which bank(s) the deceased person banked with and can then request the bank to provide details on the formal process by using the simplyEstate Notify Tool in Step 12 – Notify Relevant Government Departments, Companies and Organisations.

If the deceased person used an Accountant, the firm may also hold important documents. You will need to find out with which Accounting Firm the deceased person dealt with and request for the details on the formal process to access the documents.
Look for a tax return or invoice and check whether it states the details of an Accountant who prepared and lodged the documents.

If the deceased person used a Lawyer to draft the Will or had an ongoing relationship, the firm may also hold important documents. You will need to find out with which Law Firm the deceased person dealt with and request for the details on the formal process to access the documents.

10.4 Actions and Decisions to Complete Step

If you would like a little help from us at simplyEstate with this Step, you can email us or book your free first phone appointment. If you would like specialist help, get in touch with one of our Specialist Partners listed in the yellow section to the right or below and see how they can help.

 

If you have decided to tackle this Step yourself after reading and understanding this Step, you may want to:

  1. Identify where the deceased person held their paperwork and important files;
  2. Check with family members or Power of Attorneys where these documents may be found;
  3. Check all other listed places and any other that you can think of where important documents could be stored or located;
  4. Compile all important documents and list the government departments, companies and organisations the deceased person had dealings with;
  5. Compile all bills and read Step 14 before making payment;
  6. Check if any mortgage or loans are in place and contact the bank or financial institution to request deferral of repayments until you have a better understanding of the estate;
  7. Take note of any insurances and subscriptions that are in place; and
  8. Compile all customer reference, identification and membership numbers to help you identify the deceased person when notifying authorities, companies and organisations in Step 12.

Once you have completed all the necessary actions and decisions, you can move on to the next Step by clicking below or save progress at the top.

Do you need specialist help?

simplyEstate has partnered with select Specialists across Australia to assist you.

 

You can click on your State/Territory to find a suitable Specialist and get in touch to discuss how they can help you.

Get in Touch

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If you would like to speak to us about this Step, discuss how to engage a Specialist Partner or need support, book a Phone Appointment now.

simplyEstate is here to help.

 

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What other users say

“This is a very useful guide! As the Executor of a family friends estate, this was my go-to place for information and the services provided by the recommended tax accountant and removalists was great.”

Andrew Zhao
Melbourne
“It is a lot of materials at first but I quickly understood why. estate administration can be tricky but thanks to simplyestate, we were able to deal with my brother’s affairs in a a few months. Thank you for your help…”

Maria Stamoulis
Sydney
“simplyEstate has helped me and my family during a very difficult time after the loss of my mother. We were lost initially and don’t know how we could’ve managed without this excellent resource, thank you very much!”

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Perth

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